Propoganda and Censorship

This morning on meet the press, Chuck Todd repeatedly asked Kellyanne Conway why Trump would have his Press Secretary tell blatant, provable falsehoods in his first statement to the Press Corp. Conway answered by talking about unrelated topics, but Chuck Todd persisted. When Conway finally answered her answer was: the Press Secretary gave ‘alternative facts’. 

Today we will study the meaning of two words:

Propaganda – information, ideas, or rumors deliberately spread widely to help or harm a person, group, movement, institution, nation, etc.

Example-

“This was the largest audience to ever witness an inauguration, period — both in person and around the globe,” ~Sean Spicer, Press Secretary

But the New York Times had scientists analyze the photo’s of Trump’s inauguration, Obama’s inauguration, and The Womens March. The scientific data clearly shows Trump drew a relatively small crowd. 


“This was the largest audience to ever witness an inauguration, period — both in person and around the globe,” Sean Spicer, Press Secretary
But…
“This was the largest audience to ever witness an inauguration, period — both in person and around the globe,” Sean Spicer, Press Secretary 

Censorship – the act of suppressing news, etc., for the purpose of eliminating parts deemed objectionable on political, or other grounds.

Two examples might be:

1. Excluding and disparaging, news organizations from press briefings because their factual stories are unflattering,

2. Refusing to answer any questions at press briefings.

Got it—Don’t cloud the issue with facts, period. If Trump says it, or he has his Press Secretary say it, it is true, period. Alternate facts, faux facts, non-fact facts, Trump facts, are all good enough, period. Pass the Kool-Aid, period.


And this was another successful interview with paddington bear.

________________________
January 22, 2017

 <a href=”https://dailypost.wordpress.com/prompts/successful/”>Successful</a&gt;

7 thoughts on “Propoganda and Censorship

  1. Alternative facts. Oy! I think that the press should continue to report the facts, period, whether or not they’re welcomed in the White House press room. It’s clear that facts do not come from this White House anyway, so fear not, reporters of the world, in print, on tv or the internet, just do your jobs. You’re needed more now than even during W’s days. 😉 xoM

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Hopefully, the press will see this as an opportunity to dig in and start doing more fact checking and more reporting on what politicians don’t tell us instead of what they spoon feed us. At any rate, the rules of engagement between the media and the White House have changed. If you’re interested in delving into this topic, I wrote a post about it. It’s a bit of insider-baseball, but you might find it interesting. http://thejournalismblog.com/2017/01/4-things-we-learned-from-sean-spicers-controversial-first-press-conference/

        Liked by 1 person

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